Writing

15 Persuasive Writing Prompts To Get Your Creative Juices Flowing

Kevin Kessler
May 25, 2020
9 minutes


Choosing an engaging topic for an essay or debate can be a frustrating and time consuming experience.

Thankfully, persuasive writing prompts are here to help you!

When it comes to any writing task, particularly persuasive writing, using the right writing prompts  can make the difference between a person agreeing with you or not.

This article will provide you with 15 excellent prompts to both motivate and inspire you.

But first, let’s learn more about the subject at hand.

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What are Persuasive Writing Prompts?

Persuasive writing prompts are meant to convince a reader to agree with your opinions or ideas. These prompts cover a wide range of topics and give you the opportunity to express yourself.

Using facts, examples, and opinions, your goal is to explain why your arguments should be widely approved. However, keep in mind that if you intend your ideas and opinions to be heard, you do need to back them up with facts, which is a core tenet of persuasive writing.

If you are having trouble with these prompts, something like a graphic organizer might help you to better visualize the various writing prompts out there. You can also use Grammarly or other writing apps to avoid any errors so that your prompt comes out loud and clear.

#1: Do professional athletes deserve to earn tens of millions of dollars?

Do you think that sports stars deserve to be paid more than the doctors or scientists that save lives every year? Is it morally wrong for the top players to earn up to 100 times more than their teammates? Explain your stance on the subject, and give examples to verify your opinion.

Exaple screenshot of cumulative athlete earnings in sports.
Cumulative athlete earnings in sports.

(Image Source)

#2: Are zoos inhumane and should they be banned?

This is another great topic as it’s very engaging. Explain the reasons why you think that zoos should stay open or not. Give examples. You could also address the common arguments against your stance.

#3: Violent video games provoke violence

As video games are becoming more realistic, should they be banned or at least censored? There’s a lot of research on the subject, so use it to prove your point. It’s easier to persuade people with facts than opinions. Your persuasive writing skill depends on your ability to present facts.

#4: Should the minimum age limit for driver’s licenses change?

In some countries, you can get your driver’s license when you’re 16, while in the others you must be 18. Tell your readers which solution is better in your opinion. Show them the stats about young drivers being more prone to accidents. A persuasive letter or argument is never complete without real life stats and facts.

#5: People should stop eating meat

Is it ethical to kill animals for food? Is it necessary for our diet? Should we all become vegans? Go to the core of the subject. Give valid arguments to back up your opinion. If you’re not a vegan, try to live like one for a week and write about your experiences.

#6: Celebrities deserve privacy

Famous people often argue that they lost all privacy when they become stars. Do you sympathize with them? Do you maybe think that being a celebrity necessarily means that you have to sacrifice your privacy? Or, do they deserve a private life?

#7: Gun control should be tighter

Is owning a gun dangerous or is it more dangerous not to be able to defend yourself? This is another controversial topic. Be sure to use statistics to make your arguments more convincing. This is a type of persuasive writing where you could use a real life narrative as an example.

#8: The legal drinking age should be lowered

In some countries, high school students are allowed to consume alcohol when they turn 18, while the age limit in the United States is 21. Argue why one solution is better than the other and use the available statistics related to drinking-related incidents of anti-social behaviour.

Again, this is another persuasive writing prompt where you can talk from experience. If you want to create a convincing argument, you need to present real reasons why the legal drinking age needs to be lowered., and you need to be prepared to rebut opposing points in a debate too.

#9: Having too much money is dangerous

Does having millions of dollars in your bank account make you feel happy or does it attract people willing to exploit you? You can even argue what amount of money should be sufficient for an individual. Of course, this is a great topic to tackle, one that has many different possible arguments that can be made.

#10: School uniforms should be mandatory

When all students are dressed the same, does that conceal social inequality or kill their individuality?

Example of children clothing/uniformity.
Children uniform.

Compare schools that require and don’t require uniforms to form your opinion.

#11: Dogs are better pets than cats

Are you a cat or a dog person? You probably have a million arguments to prove or disprove each claim. You can use your preferences to back up your point and compare both species and their relationship with humans.

#12: Would eternal life be a blessing or a curse?

If you could live forever, would you choose to do so, even if you’re the only one with this ability? You can delve deeper into the mortal and ethical heart of the subject and argue whether scientists try to make our life span even longer.

#13: Make arguments why you should get the job

Imagine that you’re in the final round of a job interview. Think about what you would say to convince your prospective employer that you’re the best candidate for the job.

#14: Do aliens exist?

It’s always interesting to write about subjects that have strong arguments on both sides. One approach is to convince people that aliens exist, even if it’s on another undiscovered, faraway planet.

#15: Is it fair to keep the money you found on the street?

If you find a $100 bill with no one around, is it wrong to put it in your pocket? Should you keep it or give it to a charity? This is a great way to express your moral standards and explain why you think they’re valid.

Conclusion

Hopefully, this article has given you all the essential info about persuasive writing prompts and explained why you should use them to support your arguments. The examples we provided should be a great starting point, but you can also formulate your unique persuasive writing prompts.

If you need further help with the subject, don’t hesitate to contact our experts. If you are still having trouble with this concept. There are plenty of writer’s workshops out there that can help you improve your skills and knowledge.

Using writing prompts can and will help you win an argument, and what kinds of prompts you use will also depend on the topic at hand, so choose wisely!